GLO

Banquet For Burundi

an exciting evening of celebration with Simon Guillebaud MBE, Grace Nduwimana and Onesphore Manirakiza from Burundi

Friday 5th July 2019

7PM for 7:45PM Shepherd Churchill Room, Harrow School

The Trustees and International Director are delighted to invite you to be a part of this unique occasion. The evening will feature a stunning array of food, fun and inspiration, featuring award-winning author, Simon Guillebaud MBE, as well as the amazing Onesphore Manirakiza and Grace Nduwimana (watch her story below), all the way from Burundi; along with the opportunity to bid for some carefully selected lots in our fast-moving Happiness Auction. GLO works with outstanding local leaders in Burundi, the world's unhappiest nation (according to the United Nations), to bring sustainable change. 

Meet Amazing Grace

This short film is a beautiful update on an extraordinary life journey, well worth five minutes of your time. You can meet Grace for yourself on 5th July. Do join us if you can.

Tickets: £70           Table of 8 £540            Dress code: Smart

You can book here now.  Limited spaces.       

Any questions? Please email sally(at)greatlakesoutreach.org

Great Lakes Outreach is a registered charity no.1097267

Please see the following maps for directions and parking details:

Interview with Simon Guillebaud

Q: When were you at Harrow?

86-91

Q: What did you enjoy about Harrow?

Loved the sports, the unrepeatable antics we got up to. The Rackets set-up was superb, matches away and dinners at eccentric guests' houses.

Q: What’s your best memory of your time there?

Leading the school out as captain of cricket at Lords, hitting a six.

Q: What was your favourite subject?

Honestly lived for the afternoons and sport, didn't enjoy any subject!

Q:  What was the worst thing about school for you?

Fagging, when on the wrong end of it!

Q: Anything else you’d like to say about your time at Harrow?

I have fantastic memories, and all the more looking back am incredibly grateful for the extraordinary education and fun that I had.

Q:  When did you become a Christian?

About 15.

Q: Have you changed a lot since your time at Harrow?

Massively, but still have that same puerile sense of humour.

Q: Why do you live in the world’s poorest nation?

Because it needs the most help, a little goes a long way, it is forgotten in the eyes of the world, and I believe in Jesus' challenging teachings about those who have much being held to account for that. With privilege comes responsibility.

Q: What are you most proud of?

Being part of a group of people who are willing to lay their lives down for the transformation of the nation of Burundi. We have and continue to take great risks. The closeness is amazing, a truly rich experience.

Q: How has your education helped you?

It gave me masses of confidence.